Augustine Sermons 293E.3

How about the Father is greater than I (John 14:28)? But he emptied himselfnotice, be aware of the distinction—taking the form of a servant (Phil 2.7). Fix it in your ears, and observe how, in referring to the form of a servant, he said taking. About the form of God, though, he didn’t say taking, but said, Who, since he was in the form of God. So taking the form of a servant, being made into the likeness of man, he lowered himself, being made obedient unto death, the death indeed of the cross; for which reason also God exalted him, and gave him the name which is above every name (Phil 2.7-9). Insofar as he was made, he was exalted; exalted insofar as low; because insofar as equal to the Father, he was not exalted, because he was never low. It was insofar as he died and rose again; that he gave him the name which is above every name.

There you have Christ coming into the world, and yet he was already there: he rose again and ascended into heaven, and yet he never left it. You think of him as a man? Don’t think like that. Here’s the man; the one than whom nobody has arisen greater among those born of women (Matt 11.11). Listen to him on the subject of the other man: I am not worthy to undo the strap of his sandal (John 1.27). So take it that they are both men; but one man is God, the other is a good man because of God; one man is Truth, the other man with the help of Truth is truthful.